Painting versus photography, an ongoing polemic from the views of a so-called art critic

Painting versus photography, an ongoing polemic from the views of a so-called art critic

Painting versus photography, an ongoing polemic from the views of a so-called art critic

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An article I found today, this one will get things going for sure. Read it first, take a breath and understand that critics and writers are often failed artists who resent the art world, or anyone creating art, because they can’t themselves.

Monsieur Jones decries the death of photography as an art form, not unlike the 19th century art elite of the time, nothing new here. I guess Mr. Jones has a gig with the Guardian newspaper, as perhaps another dying form of communication not unlike his lame rhetoric. A quick search of Jonathan Jones reveals that he is firmly in lust with the art of painting, particularly with the Italian Renaissance and nothing else really matters, perhaps an obsession that could be remedied with a variety of chemicals, or better still an exile into the digital world of the Japanese sub-culture.  

Having said that, his premise still resonates with many viewers and the ultimate art elite. The medium of painting still holds onto its status as the most worthy form of art, as a decrepit mansion in need of much repairs, just Google painting and you will see their current demise, the fall of a great empire that was first conquered by photography and now the digital world in its many forms.  

Do you think that the medium of photography will ever gain the recognition it deserves, as an independent art form? Is the connected world of white noise going to simply dismiss painting in the future?

Does he have a valid point, the extreme forms of photography that simply puzzle the public, or is he a repressed writer who is in need of a good drink and perhaps a good relationship?

5 Tips on…. “Exploring your Hidden Talent”: A UPA Gallery workshop

5 Tips on…. “Exploring your Hidden Talent”: A UPA Gallery workshop

1: You need a clear direction. Before you embark on taking photographs randomly, waiting on the chance factor, one needs a clear plan of action when it comes to subject matter. Unless you are a photojournalist or street portraitist, visual opportunities will not come to you; instead you must seek a particular subject matter and plan for capturing precise images.

2: Do not look at your images on the camera’s display. The display on your camera is lying to you and in addition you are creating a false mental image of what the images should look like according to your visual experience, one far removed from what the camera captures. Use the camera display to only show you the histogram, in other words to display the technical exposure for your images, only.

3: Wait to preview your images. Just like a fine wine images have to be viewed several days after you create them. Initially, you are biased by the knowledge of where, when and how you took these images; this mental bias will inhibit you from examining the images in an impartial and free manner, often dismissing the deep and potentially important aspects of a particular photograph.

4: Take fewer images. The prevailing thinking in photography resides in taking more images and getting better by doing so. WRONG; by applying yourself in the viewfinder and carefully thinking about what and how you are capturing a photograph you will follow the intellectual and emotional aspects of what the medium is all about, namely conveying a statement to your viewer, emotional or aesthetic.

5: Less technology, more thinking. Think about the cost of every image, around $1.00 per capture considering the costs of DSLR’s lenses, software and computers, all with a limited lifespan. The digital photo world is wonderful, but no less expensive than the analog realm. You do not need to take every piece of equipment you own on very photo excursion, just the right items according to your pre-planning. Go lighter,  your body will thank you.

Welcome to The UPA Gallery!

Welcome to The UPA Gallery!

The United Photographic Artists Gallery, L.L.C. would like to give you a warm welcome to our new site! Please have a look around and get aquainted with our artists. Contact us if you have any questions or requests. 

Thank you!