UPA Artists Featured in Cincinnati Ohio Gallery Show

UPA Artists Featured in Cincinnati Ohio Gallery Show

Press release

UPA Gallery represented artists Jose Gomez and Annie Gonzalez were selected to exhibit at the Manifest Gallery in Cincinnati, Ohio for the 9th Annual International Competitive Exhibit Exploring the Uncovered Human Form in Current Art.  The exhibition runs August 18 through September 15, 2017.

Manifest‘s annual projects allow them the chance to track how artists around the world address a consistent theme, subject, or media over time, or allow them to document the state of art in a particular strata of professional creative activity, and to study and preserve findings in a meaningful way through exhibit publications and website.

NUDE is one such project. The human body is a popular subject for many reasons, the most obvious being that it is us. Throughout history the representation of the human form has been charged with tremendous energy, both positive and negative. Whether it be a religious edict that one should not depict the human form, a taboo, or the glorious opposite, a revelation of mastery over form in the crafting of sensuous and life-like physical human beauty, the art of the body has nevertheless moved us through time.

Through all the permutations art has experienced across history, work of the body persists. We use the human nude to master skill, understand ourselves, and push social and psychological buttons for the sake of expression (sensual, delicate, political, aggressive, and so on). We intend for Manifest’s ongoing annual NUDE project to explore how our collective body is used today in art to achieve these goals and more.

2727 woodburn avenue cincinnati, ohio 45206

http://www.manifestgallery.org/index.html

 

 

About The United Photographic Artists Gallery

 

The United Photographic Artists Gallery, L.L.C. is the intellectual and practical collaboration of emerging artists in the medium of photography, all with very diverse cultural and generational backgrounds. We are fully engaged artists, versed in the fine art world and dedicated to the excellence of the medium. Our mission is to grow the medium of photography as an overall validated art form and to support other emerging artists in their artistic endeavors with a solid track record in photographic education (fine art and commercial genres), consulting on many levels, international judging backgrounds and curatorial duties, the founding members of UPAG are committed to supporting our members through dialogues and consultations, the end goal residing firmly into a positive and progressive outlook for all involved.

UPA Artist Featured Exhibition at the Griffen Museum – Personalities & In Boston Globe Article

UPA Artist Featured Exhibition at the Griffen Museum – Personalities & In Boston Globe Article

Press release

UPA Gallery represented artist Gary Beeber was selected to exhibit at the Griffen Museum with his Personalities Exhibition.  The exhibition runs through Sept. 1, 2017.

He was also featured in the Boston Globe article covering the exhibition.  Gary Beeber’s background and inspirations are discussed in the piece.

In Beeber’s exhibition the viewer is introduced to Mona Marlowe a NYC trans-gender nightlife personality. Beeber says, “Mona sacrificed everything in order to become the femme fatale she always wanted to be.” He continues, “When I photographed Mona I remember how intensely the room smelled of perfume.” Other personalities in Beeber’s ensemble include Steve D., a red blooded American with a very strong point of view. Jimmy Mack is another unconventional fellow who Beeber met at a Polar Bear plunge when Mack to raise money for charity arrived in a mermaid costume. Scott Baker (The Twisted Shockmeister), Bettina May (International Burlesque Star), Shelly Watson(the Sinking Siren), Early Ross (late-night host), Mss Vee (late night entertainer), and David Slater (Collage Artist) join the other personalities on the walls of the Griffin Gallery.

 

See the article here: http://bit.ly/garybeeberbostonglobe

Griffin Museum of Photography, 67 Shore Road, Winchester, through Sept. 1. 781-729-1158, http://griffinmuseum.org/show/personalities/

 

About The United Photographic Artists Gallery

The United Photographic Artists Gallery, L.L.C. is the intellectual and practical collaboration of emerging artists in the medium of photography, all with very diverse cultural and generational backgrounds. We are fully engaged artists, versed in the fine art world and dedicated to the excellence of the medium. Our mission is to grow the medium of photography as an overall validated art form and to support other emerging artists in their artistic endeavors with a solid track record in photographic education (fine art and commercial genres), consulting on many levels, international judging backgrounds and curatorial duties, the founding members of UPAG are committed to supporting our members through dialogues and consultations, the end goal residing firmly into a positive and progressive outlook for all involved.

UPA Artists Selected For PhotoPlace Gallery Portals Exhibition

UPA Artists Selected For PhotoPlace Gallery Portals Exhibition

Press release

UPA Gallery represented artists Gary Beeber and Ron Weiss had images selected for inclusion in the PhotoPlace Gallery Portals Exhibition. The exhibition runs August 16- September 9, 2017.

The Ron Weiss Piece, Oblivion will be featured and the Gary Beeber piece, Entrance (Big Mouth), Fairborn, Ohio will be featured.

The exhibition sought entries that could be an architectural feature: a gate, a doorway, a window, a mirror, or a tunnel, that frames or isolates or adds a new dimension to the image in intriguing ways.

The call for pieces also espoused that a portal is also a magical doorway that connects two locations in space or time.

The show was juried by Aline Smithson, represented by galleries in the U.S. and Europe and published throughout the world.

Aline Smithson has exhibited widely in over thirty solo shows including the Griffin Museum of Photography, the Fort Collins Museum of Contemporary Art, the Lishui, Pingyao, and Shanghai Festivals in China, the Tagomago Gallery in Barcelona and Paris, and the Wallspace Gallery in Seattle and Santa Barbara. In addition, her work is held in a number of public collections. Her photographs have been featured in publications including The New York Times, The New Yorker, Photo District news, Communication Arts, Real Simple, Eyemazing, Visura, Slate, Artworks, Shots, Click, and Silvershotz magazines.

Photoplace Gallery is located at 3 Park Street Middlebury, VT 05753.

About The United Photographic Artists Gallery

The United Photographic Artists Gallery, L.L.C. is the intellectual and practical collaboration of emerging artists in the medium of photography, all with very diverse cultural and generational backgrounds. We are fully engaged artists, versed in the fine art world and dedicated to the excellence of the medium. Our mission is to grow the medium of photography as an overall validated art form and to support other emerging artists in their artistic endeavors with a solid track record in photographic education (fine art and commercial genres), consulting on many levels, international judging backgrounds and curatorial duties, the founding members of UPAG are committed to supporting our members through dialogues and consultations, the end goal residing firmly into a positive and progressive outlook for all involved.

How to present your fine art photography / How NOT to present it

How to present your fine art photography / How NOT to present it

In the past couple of years I seem to be regularly assaulted by many aspiring artists who want me to look at their work. Nothing wrong with that premise as I always appreciate looking at photographic art within many diverse genres.

The problem resides with artists shoving their cell phones in my face, usually accompanied by various comments such as “look at this cool image”, “It took me weeks to do this”, “I was lucky with this one”, “this is an amazing photograph and nobody can do the same”, “what do you think”?

The problem clearly resides in the fact that by presenting your art in such a format has simply denigrated it, trashed it beyond any repair. Art is an important thing, a crucial expression of a most important communication with the world at large, and for many a most compelling endeavor. Now I am forced to look at it on a device that ridicules photography and art as a whole, even with cell phone photography if that is the technique used to create such artistic outcomes.

Recently, a wonderful lady pulled her cell phone out of her bra and asked me to scroll through various unsavory selfies and a few potentially great art photographs. A guy pulled his cell phone from his back pocket, clearly next to his ass, and apologized to the remnants of his lunch on the glass face. Really!

Occasionally, a large I-Pad is presented and the scrolling is either done by the artist, which of course I completely resent (let me see your work at my appreciative pace, not yours), or I am asked to ignore the various cat or dog images intermingled with “the work”.

So, if you truly want to show your artistic work to others, a gallery curator, artist and art consultant, please, please do not use cell phones or electronic devices to show your life’s work and ambitions. Would you turn up at a hot date without bathing for a week? Would you show up at a major job interview wearing ragged and dirty jeans and flip-flops? Would you embarrass yourself just because of neglect, or because wearing a too tight speedo at a classy beach BBQ party sounded like a good idea at the time?

Instead, why not present your amazing art in a printed format? A small Blurb book of your work only costs $25, and you can give a copy to a very relevant person who might just advance your career in a chance meeting. The book will be read carefully, at a pace that allows for appreciation of the art, not the ubiquitous protective stupid case around your cell phone, supposedly representing your so-called “personality”.  

Why not carry small prints of your art? If you have a business card with your professional website (not your Facebook personal page as I really do not want to know what you think, or your opinions about anything at all), I will surely look at your website and most likely will bookmark it for future. As opportunities arise, I refer to, and often pass on to others in the art world, the work of the artists who have shown great and interesting work, no matter what the genre is, who deeply care about what they do and are able to present to an audience. Can you achieve this with your cell phone? NO

So, just stop showing your art on cell phones and other electronic devices that will simply denigrate what you do; Create and produce mini books, prints some small prints you can give to your audience, these will be appreciated and define you as an artist, not a fool. Yes, the world of photography is mostly digital, but guess what you see in an art gallery or museum? Prints. Guess what you sell as an artist? Prints

This is how we show our work. It has brought us many group and solo shows, many sales and a multitude of contacts in the art world. I don’t even have photographs on my cell phone; I use it to make phone calls, not to present our art that is our life, career and profession.


Painting versus photography, an ongoing polemic from the views of a so-called art critic

Painting versus photography, an ongoing polemic from the views of a so-called art critic

Painting versus photography, an ongoing polemic from the views of a so-called art critic

Click To Read The Article

An article I found today, this one will get things going for sure. Read it first, take a breath and understand that critics and writers are often failed artists who resent the art world, or anyone creating art, because they can’t themselves.

Monsieur Jones decries the death of photography as an art form, not unlike the 19th century art elite of the time, nothing new here. I guess Mr. Jones has a gig with the Guardian newspaper, as perhaps another dying form of communication not unlike his lame rhetoric. A quick search of Jonathan Jones reveals that he is firmly in lust with the art of painting, particularly with the Italian Renaissance and nothing else really matters, perhaps an obsession that could be remedied with a variety of chemicals, or better still an exile into the digital world of the Japanese sub-culture.  

Having said that, his premise still resonates with many viewers and the ultimate art elite. The medium of painting still holds onto its status as the most worthy form of art, as a decrepit mansion in need of much repairs, just Google painting and you will see their current demise, the fall of a great empire that was first conquered by photography and now the digital world in its many forms.  

Do you think that the medium of photography will ever gain the recognition it deserves, as an independent art form? Is the connected world of white noise going to simply dismiss painting in the future?

Does he have a valid point, the extreme forms of photography that simply puzzle the public, or is he a repressed writer who is in need of a good drink and perhaps a good relationship?