UPA Artist Featured Exhibition at the Griffen Museum – Personalities & In Boston Globe Article

UPA Artist Featured Exhibition at the Griffen Museum – Personalities & In Boston Globe Article

Press release

UPA Gallery represented artist Gary Beeber was selected to exhibit at the Griffen Museum with his Personalities Exhibition.  The exhibition runs through Sept. 1, 2017.

He was also featured in the Boston Globe article covering the exhibition.  Gary Beeber’s background and inspirations are discussed in the piece.

In Beeber’s exhibition the viewer is introduced to Mona Marlowe a NYC trans-gender nightlife personality. Beeber says, “Mona sacrificed everything in order to become the femme fatale she always wanted to be.” He continues, “When I photographed Mona I remember how intensely the room smelled of perfume.” Other personalities in Beeber’s ensemble include Steve D., a red blooded American with a very strong point of view. Jimmy Mack is another unconventional fellow who Beeber met at a Polar Bear plunge when Mack to raise money for charity arrived in a mermaid costume. Scott Baker (The Twisted Shockmeister), Bettina May (International Burlesque Star), Shelly Watson(the Sinking Siren), Early Ross (late-night host), Mss Vee (late night entertainer), and David Slater (Collage Artist) join the other personalities on the walls of the Griffin Gallery.

 

See the article here: http://bit.ly/garybeeberbostonglobe

Griffin Museum of Photography, 67 Shore Road, Winchester, through Sept. 1. 781-729-1158, http://griffinmuseum.org/show/personalities/

 

About The United Photographic Artists Gallery

The United Photographic Artists Gallery, L.L.C. is the intellectual and practical collaboration of emerging artists in the medium of photography, all with very diverse cultural and generational backgrounds. We are fully engaged artists, versed in the fine art world and dedicated to the excellence of the medium. Our mission is to grow the medium of photography as an overall validated art form and to support other emerging artists in their artistic endeavors with a solid track record in photographic education (fine art and commercial genres), consulting on many levels, international judging backgrounds and curatorial duties, the founding members of UPAG are committed to supporting our members through dialogues and consultations, the end goal residing firmly into a positive and progressive outlook for all involved.

UPA Artists Selected For PhotoPlace Gallery Portals Exhibition

UPA Artists Selected For PhotoPlace Gallery Portals Exhibition

Press release

UPA Gallery represented artists Gary Beeber and Ron Weiss had images selected for inclusion in the PhotoPlace Gallery Portals Exhibition. The exhibition runs August 16- September 9, 2017.

The Ron Weiss Piece, Oblivion will be featured and the Gary Beeber piece, Entrance (Big Mouth), Fairborn, Ohio will be featured.

The exhibition sought entries that could be an architectural feature: a gate, a doorway, a window, a mirror, or a tunnel, that frames or isolates or adds a new dimension to the image in intriguing ways.

The call for pieces also espoused that a portal is also a magical doorway that connects two locations in space or time.

The show was juried by Aline Smithson, represented by galleries in the U.S. and Europe and published throughout the world.

Aline Smithson has exhibited widely in over thirty solo shows including the Griffin Museum of Photography, the Fort Collins Museum of Contemporary Art, the Lishui, Pingyao, and Shanghai Festivals in China, the Tagomago Gallery in Barcelona and Paris, and the Wallspace Gallery in Seattle and Santa Barbara. In addition, her work is held in a number of public collections. Her photographs have been featured in publications including The New York Times, The New Yorker, Photo District news, Communication Arts, Real Simple, Eyemazing, Visura, Slate, Artworks, Shots, Click, and Silvershotz magazines.

Photoplace Gallery is located at 3 Park Street Middlebury, VT 05753.

About The United Photographic Artists Gallery

The United Photographic Artists Gallery, L.L.C. is the intellectual and practical collaboration of emerging artists in the medium of photography, all with very diverse cultural and generational backgrounds. We are fully engaged artists, versed in the fine art world and dedicated to the excellence of the medium. Our mission is to grow the medium of photography as an overall validated art form and to support other emerging artists in their artistic endeavors with a solid track record in photographic education (fine art and commercial genres), consulting on many levels, international judging backgrounds and curatorial duties, the founding members of UPAG are committed to supporting our members through dialogues and consultations, the end goal residing firmly into a positive and progressive outlook for all involved.

5 Tips on…. “Exploring your Hidden Talent”: A UPA Gallery workshop

5 Tips on…. “Exploring your Hidden Talent”: A UPA Gallery workshop

1: You need a clear direction. Before you embark on taking photographs randomly, waiting on the chance factor, one needs a clear plan of action when it comes to subject matter. Unless you are a photojournalist or street portraitist, visual opportunities will not come to you; instead you must seek a particular subject matter and plan for capturing precise images.

2: Do not look at your images on the camera’s display. The display on your camera is lying to you and in addition you are creating a false mental image of what the images should look like according to your visual experience, one far removed from what the camera captures. Use the camera display to only show you the histogram, in other words to display the technical exposure for your images, only.

3: Wait to preview your images. Just like a fine wine images have to be viewed several days after you create them. Initially, you are biased by the knowledge of where, when and how you took these images; this mental bias will inhibit you from examining the images in an impartial and free manner, often dismissing the deep and potentially important aspects of a particular photograph.

4: Take fewer images. The prevailing thinking in photography resides in taking more images and getting better by doing so. WRONG; by applying yourself in the viewfinder and carefully thinking about what and how you are capturing a photograph you will follow the intellectual and emotional aspects of what the medium is all about, namely conveying a statement to your viewer, emotional or aesthetic.

5: Less technology, more thinking. Think about the cost of every image, around $1.00 per capture considering the costs of DSLR’s lenses, software and computers, all with a limited lifespan. The digital photo world is wonderful, but no less expensive than the analog realm. You do not need to take every piece of equipment you own on very photo excursion, just the right items according to your pre-planning. Go lighter,  your body will thank you.

5 Reasons To Give Long Exposure Photography a Try:

5 Reasons To Give Long Exposure Photography a Try:

From a guest blog by our friend Andrew Vernon

Hello! This is Andrew Vernon with a guest post for the United Photographic Artists blog. I am a Tampa-based portrait and landscape photographer who specializes in florida seascape and long exposure photography. I wanted to put together a post on some of the reasons a photographer might consider long exposure when creating a new image. That being said, if you’re interested in seeing more Florida landscape or long exposure photography feel free to visit my website.


 

 Using long exposure photography to capture an image is nothing new. In fact, for many photographers, its one of the first things theyre excited to try out because of how it allows for results that are so different than anything most other cameras on the market can offer. All sorts of photographers jump at the first opportunity to paint with light, photograph the stars or get a ghosted photo of water plummeting over a waterfall. And, theres less of an instant-gratification to it. The photographer knows the probable outcome, but the results are still less uniform which can sometimes mean more exciting! But, there are more reasons than these popular cliches for slowing down your shutter speed. In fact, Id like to offer 5 reasons you might not have considered for long exposure as a technique in your photography

Andrew Vernon: Evening Mist Andrew Vernon: Evening Mist

1 – Long Exposure introduces Time into your photography:

            A photograph is typically a look into a particular moment in time. It’s an opportunity for a photographer to convey to their viewer a scene or an instance as it was when the shutter was released. But, this can be limiting! Ever tried to photograph a river or creek only to realize that is just doesn’t feel the same as actually standing there? Or perhaps photographed mist moving through a beautiful mountain range only to realize that an instant image somehow stole some of the life from the living and moving mist in front of you? Sometimes, there is a faint something lost when time isn’t able to affect the scene you’re photographing. But, long exposure allows for time to affect the scene and breath some life into moments that otherwise wouldn’t have carried the same power frozen into a single moment. Suddenly, a single photograph can better demonstrate the wave-like way that the mist was crawling through the valley…

Andrew Vernon: The Pier at Sandy Point Andrew Vernon: The Pier at Sandy Point

2 – Long Exposure Simplifies:

            Sometimes the simplest images are also the strongest. Long exposure allows for anything moving inside the frame to blur and anything holding still to remain sharp. This means a simple dock on a windy evening photographed without long exposure could reveal a busy scene with capped waves, boats, animals etc. The same image photographed using a longer exposure could reveal a dock that stands out in the photo because the water appears silky smooth as a result of the motion. Longer exposures can mean animals, people and other moving objects don’t pose any issues either as they simply may not hold still long enough to be seen in the final image. Need to simplify your image or point more clearly to a particular subject? Long Exposure could make that happen. 

Andrew Vernon: Withstand Andrew Vernon: Withstand

3 – Long Exposure Introduces Drama:

 

            Much like how Long Exposure can simplify an image, it can also introduce drama in a dynamic way. Imagine a beach with waves crashing into shore. A freeze frame steals the drama of the scene… There could be something lost when the wave is frozen instead of it’s power being demonstrated in the blur and movement from the moment it crashes. It’s all in your choice of shutter speed. Typically, all it takes is 1/4 of a second to convey movement. And sometimes, the movement is everything. 

Andrew Vernon: Guardian Andrew Vernon: Guardian

4 – Long Exposure stands out:

 

            Using long exposure provides an opportunity to be different. It allows for photography that is different in feeling, story or motion than most of what the mobile or point and shoot photography market can or could produce. It’s important to note however that long exposure doesn’t necessarily make an image better. It’s a tool. And like other tools, it has certain uses that it lends itself to. Used well as a technique to achieve the artistic goal of the photographer, long exposure works to strengthen the final product. But, the contrary is true as well. Used poorly, long exposure can be a distracting or cliche technique that undermines the power of an image. 

Andrew Vernon: Show of Power Andrew Vernon: Show of Power

5 – Long Exposure gives control:

 

            This reason stems from the previous ones; But, it’s valuable to mention that learning a technique such as long exposure puts more power in the hands of the artist. The more methods you have at your disposal when creating an image, the better the chance of being able to accurately portray your final piece exactly as you’d visualized it. It’s a tool that allows opportunity to build drama, demonstrate motion or simplify a scene. And it’s definitely a tool that, when used in the right context, can allow an image to stand out.

 

Hopefully this was a helpful look at some of the ways you might consider using long exposure to strengthen your photography! While this wasn’t, a tutorial by any means on how to actually create a long exposure image, it’s always beneficial to understand the why before blindly using a technique for no reason. To see more Florida landscape and long exposure photography, please visit my website at www.AndrewVernonPhotography.com

 


 

By the way, here’s some of the ways you can keep up with me online:

Website – http://www.AndrewVernonPhotography.com

Facebook – http://www.Facebook.com/AndrewVernonPhotography

Twitter – @Andrew_Vernon

 

I am Matthew Smith and I am a participant of ISSP 2014, Latvia

I am Matthew Smith and I am a participant of ISSP 2014, Latvia

Acccepted: Matt Smith

““Only 73 photographers get accepted into this program to study from and work among the elite.”

I was nervous about checking the Participants List, sitting in my dimly lit office/bedroom/parent’s basement at 3am. The International Summer School of Photography webpage was up on my screen, the mouse hovering over the “Participants” menu. Only 73 photographers get accepted into this program to study from and work among the elite. Timidly, I clicked through and scrolled down to the workshop taught by internationally renown photographer Yurie Nagashima – Photography as a Subversive Tactic: Being the Other. A list of 12 accepted photographers followed.

Among them: Matthew Smith, United States.

Double-take, triple-take. “Wait, what?” No, there must be some sort of mistake. “What? No. Are you serious?”     ….Matthew Smith.

Yurie Nagashima, This Time Yurie Nagashima, This Time (c) Yurie Nagashima, The Onion, 2005 (c) Yurie Nagashima, The Onion, 2005

The International Summer School of Photography in Kuldiga, Latvia is designed for professional photographers, students of photography and art, artists working with photography, focusing on concept rather than technique. The aim is to broaden the artistic and personal vision of participants and to encourage international exchange of ideas in photography.

The program offers 6 workshops taught by renown photography masters. This year’s classes will be hosted by Mark Steinmetz, Yurie Nagashima, Antonin Kratochvil, Simon Norfolk, Adrien Kelterborn, Rafal Milach and Ania Nalecka. 

I am Matthew Smith and I am a participant of ISSP 2014.

When I learned about the program in August 2013, I was set on applying for the next year’s Summer School. Once applications were open, I got right to it. I poured over my college projects, looking for something of worth to submit for my portfolio. After two weeks of painstaking image review, bio writing and rewriting and rewriting, I pulled together 9 strong photographs to compliment my 1500 character essay on why I should be a part of such an intensive program.

I submitted photographs based on the jury, my chosen workshop, and my personal artistic vision.

By Matt Smith By Matt Smith

Working in self-portraiture, portraiture, street photography, and mixed media, I use photography mostly as a means of nonverbal communication and personal enlightenment. I want to challenge my audience, I want to create something provocative, and I want to make a significant difference in the way people view the relationship between themselves, their peers, and the rest of the world. 

Polaroids, By Matt Smith Polaroids, By Matt Smith

In self-portraiture, I break the barrier between the audience and the camera. The audience gets a raw look at the subject without the concept of the photographer (the subject) clouding the atmosphere. This creates an intimate relationship between the subject and audience, stimulating emotional responses. 

I try to focus on the strength my relationships – whether it be with the audience, friends, family, myself, or my imagination. As these relationships are tested by adversity, I document the individual journeys to better understand their tangible nature and to better understand myself.

Photo By Matt Smith Photo By Matt Smith Photo By Matt Smith Photo By Matt Smith

I approach each photograph with the intent to study human behavior, interpersonal relationships, and the unique experience of individual perception. Can we trust what we see? Is it absolute? Why do we do the things we do?

Photo By Matt Smith Photo By Matt Smith

I try to compare a sense of self to a sense of place by creating parallels between myself and my surroundings. Does environment dictate, and justify, behavior?

Photography is my way of keeping a grip on reality and on myself while also challenging my perception of reality.

 

     Written BY: Matt Smith